Guns germs and steel chapter 2. Guns Germs & Steel: The Show. Episode Two 2019-02-03

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Guns, Germs, and Steel Chapter 3: Collision at Cajamarca Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

guns germs and steel chapter 2

After an initial dialogue with the friar, Atahuallpa requested to see the friar's Bible, which the friar handed over. Farming arose early in the since the area had an abundance of wild wheat and species that were nutritious and easy to domesticate. Chapter 10: Eurasia has covered the largest East to West area of any continent. Their main source of food was the Sago tree; this only provided about 70 pounds of food and did not provide the nutrients needed to survive. In the Fertile Crescent, plants and animals spread quickly into Europe and North Africa. The islands were also small and supported a population of 2,000. Overall, both human and natural selection helped certain plants to survive and spread more than others.

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Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide

guns germs and steel chapter 2

They made battle and travel easier. The Incas had no way to combat cavalry, and those that retreated or fled to find help were easily caught by the men on horseback. To make matters worse for the Incas, Atahuallpa was held captive for eight months until an enormous sum of gold was delivered for his release. Analysis The first chapter of this section begins with another personal anecdote. Archived from on October 15, 2007. These plants slowly became more common, until they became domestic crops.


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Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide

guns germs and steel chapter 2

Spanish horsemanship, based on principles of cattle-herding, was famous throughout Europe for its manoeuvrability and spontaneity — skills learned by Pizarro's conquistadors in their youth. Australia was known to isolate itself along with New Guinea. Sometimes though infections can spread very slowly, which makes it act more effectively because no one discovers it. Because they had a larger and denser population, the Maori people were more technologically advanced with more complex societies and technology. Geography had endowed Europe with rich sources of iron and wood, and a climate conducive to high-temperature metallurgy.

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Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

guns germs and steel chapter 2

One important way to classify the different Polynesian societies is by their methods of food production. Similar circumstances were observed in the and in. Diamond believes that this is yet another r advantage for Eurasia. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. Areas that grew things like acorns had a disadvantage. These economic and technological advantages eventually enabled Europeans to conquer the peoples of the other continents in recent centuries by using the guns and steel of the book's title. Diamond identifies a mere 14 domesticated large mammal species worldwide.


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Chapter Summary of Guns Germs and Steel

guns germs and steel chapter 2

Diamond can study the influence of an independent variable—geography—on the dependent variable—the people and societies of Polynesia. By contrast, the Maori who remained in New Zealand grew in number; they formed locally dense populations and engaged in continual warfare. Scholars like Stephen Walt and have put the book on lists of texts that any student of politics or history should read. Eurasia's dense populations, high levels of trade, and living in close proximity to livestock resulted in widespread transmission of diseases, including from animals to humans. Analyses how the Incan emperor was captured and how the Spanish peoples gems led to the deaths of many south Americans 2. They were located on the northern part of New Zealand and they were involved in more war-like problems. Diamond explains that all of Polynesia was colonized from about 1200 B.

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Essay on Guns, Germs, and Steel Chapter by Chapter Summary

guns germs and steel chapter 2

Potentially domesticable wild animals were also an important feature of a given environment, for example. Trade tends to move farther east and west, because they share the same day length, diseases, seasons, and climate. The Great Leap Forward was also important because without the evolution of cave paintings and stone tools, the society that we live in would be. According to the author, how does racism affect the argument? This time was also the end of the Pleistocene Era, the depression of the last Ice Age, and the beginning of the Recent Era. It is more difficult to explain why food production failed to appear until modern times in some areas that should have been very suitable for it, such as the West Coast of America. But will his theories work in every corner of the globe? This section contains 539 words approx.

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Jared Diamond: Guns, Germs, and Steel: Chapter 2; A Natural Experiment of History

guns germs and steel chapter 2

First, and most obviously, it shows how Pizarro defeated the Incas—he used his horses, his deception, and his weapons to do so. That people developed certain things suddenly instead of gradually, that the clovis was responsible for many mass extinctions of large mammals around 11,000 B. Many were killed by infectious diseases such as smallpox and measles. While many readers may not have a strong scientific background and may be thrown off by his explanations, most people have at least heard of Charles Darwin and the principle of natural selection. Thanks to the geographic ease with which ideas spread through the continent of Eurasia, discoveries like gunpowder could also migrate thousands of miles, from China to Spain.

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Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide

guns germs and steel chapter 2

The Maori and the Moriori developed very differently, despite having common ancestors. The explanation could lie either with local people being incompetent, or locally available wild plants having some kind of problem. He explains how plants typically reproduce, how this reproduction can be influenced by humans, and how natural selection means that certain plant features are preserved for further generations while others fade out of the gene pool. Eurasia's large landmass and long east-west distance increased these advantages. In this chapter, Diamond will analyze another important case study for the clashes between cultures—and like its predecessors, the case is militaristic in nature. New Guinea was geographically isolated and progressed slowly for a few reasons. Domestication of animals means transforming them into something more useful to humans.

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